Design and development of gait-powered active thermoregulatory insole using thermoelectric module (TEC) powered by lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric discs

RYA ZENILDE T. CAWALING, LYLE KENNETH M. GERALDEZ, ELCID M. VILLEGAS, AND RAPHAEL ERIC C. YTURRALDE
Philippine Science High School – Western Visayas Campus, Brgy. Bito-on, Jaro, Iloilo City 5000, Department of Science and Technology – Science Education Institute, Philippines


Abstract
Existing footwear design lacks crucial potential foot thermoregulation feature. By utilizing piezoelectric and thermoelectric energy manipulation, the study successfully developed a battery-replenishing thermoregulating insole which is solid-state and portable with zero carbon-emission capable of harvesting 500 mW of power with an efficiency of 0.3, heating the foot up to 40°C with a COP of 1.89, and cooling the foot down to 23°C with a COP of 0.89.

Keywords: renewable energy source, foot thermoregulation, piezoelectricity, thermoelectricity


Fygo: An automated dormitory leave pass mobile application for Philippine Science High School – Western Visayas dormitories using Thunkable

FLOYD NIÑO ARTHUR G. ROXAS, REINALD JAN M. SUBONG, PAUL ANDREW D. FUENTES, GERALD U. SALAZAR and EISEN ED C. BRIONES
Philippine Science High School – Western Visayas Campus, Brgy. Bito-on, Jaro, Iloilo City 5000, Department of Science and Technology – Science Education Institute, Philippines


Abstract
The dormitory leave pass system, used in Philippine Science High School – Western Visayas Campus (PSHS-WVC), uses a traditional pen and paper method of filing. It has various limitations due to it being a cumbersome, multi-step, and unconventional method. This study aimed to automate such system locally through developing a mobile application that is capable of filing and approving leave pass, viewing records, and logging in or out interns based on the type of user. The application was created using Thunkable and Firebase. The developed application, Fygo, is composed of five different subsystems: login, registration, intern, dorm manager, and guard subsystem. Fygo was able to perform its intended purpose of being able to file and check status of leave pass (intern subsystem), approve leave pass and view log records of interns (dorm manager subsystem), log in or out interns (guard subsystem). Fygo could be further developed to accommodate offline capabilities and be customized base on the structure of the institution.

Keywords: mobile application, Thunkable, Firebase, Android, app development


Comparison of the cavitation activity of ethanol and acetic acid as ultrasonic cleaning solution

EUGENE O. IMBANG, LJ JESSE A. MACADANGDANG, FRED RIC C. SARA, and MARIA MILAGROSA A. NULLA
Philippine Science High School – Western Visayas Campus, Brgy. Bito-on, Jaro, Iloilo City 5000, Department of Science and Technology – Science Education Institute, Philippines


Abstract
Ethanol and acetic acid are chemicals recommended for industrial cleaning purposes, yet a knowledge gap exists on the cavitation activity of either chemicals, which indicates ultrasonic cleaning efficiency. The study compared the cavitation activity of ethanol and acetic acid using Foil Test Method of Crawford (1964). The objective measured and compared the eroded area of the foil after being subjected to ultrasonic cleaning under the respective chemical solution for certain time intervals. The foil, 10 cm x 8cm, were exposed to different time intervals – 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 seconds with three trials for each interval. The foil was then photographed. The eroded area of the foil was measured using ImageJ™ software. The mean area per trial were analyzed. The data yielded p=0.0351 > 0.05 and t=3.224 > critical value=2.776, indicating a significant difference between the area of foil erosion caused by the two chemicals.


Keywords: cavitation, ultrasound, ultrasonic cleaning, ethanol, acetic acid


Influences of dye pH on the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells using natural dye extracted from Clitoria ternatea

ANGELICA SHALENE T ESTERA, JOEY F MARTINEZ, DOREEN MARIE S SORONGON, and ARIS LARRODER, Ph. D.
Philippine Science High School – Western Visayas Campus, Brgy. Bito-on, Jaro, Iloilo City 5000, Department of Science and Technology – Science Education Institute, Philippines


Abstract
The efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is dependent on the nature, optimization and compatibility of its components. A strong adsorption of the dye unto the titanium dioxide (TiO2) is essential for the efficient electron injection into the TiO2 semiconductor. Clitoria ternatea (CT) has a relatively high thermal stability, absorbance level, and anthocyanin content; however, it contains longer aromatic groups which affect the binding of dye molecules into the TiO2 surface resulting to relatively low efficiency. This study was conducted to determine the influences of CT dye at different pH level, specifically, pH 1.0, 4.0, and 5.8 as dye sensitizer on the efficiency of DSSCs. Results show that CT extracts at pH 5.8 (control) has the highest absorbance followed by pH 4.0, and pH 1.0. However, when the dyes were sensitized in the TiO2, pH 4.0 has the highest amount of dye adsorbed and energy conversion efficiency of 0.05%.


Keywords: DSSC, Clitoria ternatea, photovoltaic, adsorption, pH


Porous ceramic modified with hydrous manganese oxide as potential sorbent of cadmium and lead in water

CRIS JERICHO G. CRUZ1, DARYL JOHN A. LIBIANO1, RIENYL AIKEN M. BACONGALLO1, RAMON ANGELO N. SINCO1,
and NORWELL BRIAN C. BAUTISTA2
1Philippine Science High School – Western Visayas Campus, Brgy. Bito-on, Jaro, Iloilo City 5000, Department of Science and Technology – Science Education Institute, Philippines
2University of the Philippines Visayas, Miagao, Iloilo 5023, Philippines


Abstract
Hydrous manganese oxide (HMO) is capable of adsorbing heavy metals in water, specifically cadmium and lead. HMO was integrated into porous ceramic water filter using 3-minotriethoxysilane (APTES) as a coupling agent. Three porous ceramic samples, one modified with HMO using APTES, another modified with HMO without APTES, and one unmodified porous ceramic, were viewed under a JEOL JSM-5510LV model Scanning Electron Microscope to view their external morphological structures. Images show that porous ceramic modified with HMO using APTES have serrated bulb-like structures compared to the amorphous covering exhibited by the porous ceramic modified with HMO only. The porous ceramic modified with HMO was then exposed to cadmium and lead solutions of known concentrations. The amount of the heavy metals in the solution was then quantified using Agilent Microwave Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometer system. The analysis shows that porous ceramic modified with HMO using APTES results to lower amounts of cadmium and lead in water samples compared to porous ceramic only.


Keywords: heavy metals, porous ceramic, hydrous manganese oxide, lead, cadmium


Effect of angle increments and morphological complexity on the application of photogrammetry on the shells of Turbo crassus, Angaria delphinus, and Thais aculeata

CAREY LOUISE B. ARROYO, MICHELLE I. GERVERO, MARIA MILAGROSA A. NULLA, and ZENNIFER L. OBERIO
Philippine Science High School – Western Visayas Campus, Brgy.Bito-on, Jaro, Iloilo City 5000, Department of Science and Technology – Science Education Institute, Philippines


Abstract
Photogrammetry is the act of generating a three-dimensional model using photographs taken from various angles around an object. It can be applied in various fields such as designing in architecture and documentation in historical researches and calculating volume and irregularity in biological researches. This study aimed to determine the extent of agreement between photogrammetric measurements and the direct measurements. Specifically, effects of the morphological complexity of the specimens and the angle increments utilized in the acquisition of photographs were explored. To do so, three sea snail shells with varying morphological complexities were chosen as specimens. Photographs of the shells were taken with the following angle increments: 5°, 8°, and 12° and were run through Autodesk Recap Photo. Body length and width were measured directly and photogrammetrically. These were statistically analyzed using Bland-Altman Plots and Two One-sided Test (TOST) for Equivalence. It was found that the three-dimensional models produced are accurate representations of the objects. Furthermore, results showed that accuracy of the model increases as angle increment increases and that as complexity of the shell increases, so does the accuracy of body length measurements.

Keywords: angle increments, morphological complexity, photogrammetry